Posts Tagged ‘the times’

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Harding calls ‘the trickery and fakery’ of circulation figures

November 18, 2009

James Harding, Editor of The Times

Finally someone has said it.

The editor of The Times, James Harding, yesterday stated that circulation is not the be-all-and-end-all of online newspapers. And he went on to outline a number of ways he can add value for loyal (and presumably, paying) customers.

“We think it’s good for us and good for business to stop encouraging the trickery and fakery of the ABCs. We want real sales to real customers – that’s what our advertisers want too.”

The Murdoch show – followed closely here – rumbles on.

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Murdoch: get off my land!

November 10, 2009
Rupert Murdoch

Picture courtesy of Michael Albov http://www.flickr.com/people/44653897@N00

So that’s how it’s going to be, then.  Rupert Murdoch today hinted that his decision to charge for online content will be enabled by building walls and closing access by legal action.  Not very new media.

The decision to charge for content on News Corporation’s media sites around the world (which include The Times and The Sun in the UK, Wall Street Journal via Dow Jones and The Australian) seemed like the first step in a sensible direction for online media.

Coming just a week after he admitted his online payment plans are behind schedule, Murdoch’s interview on Sky News Australia reveals he is prepared to take a very heavy-handed approach to ensuring he creates a watertight system for monetising his online media assets.

Is this worth it?  While there is rock-solid logic to the argument for charging for media content when there is a cost associated with its creation and distribution, it’s not clear that issuing threats to sue the BBC will genuinely help the media industry move towards a sensible settlement with its customers.

What’s holding back online media is a lack of micropayment standards to allow them to make money from their work.  The focus should be on the establishment of a standard that allows users to pay for what they use, without onerous barriers to entry (so a mix of prepay and post-billed options would make sense).

Even if this is merely the opening parry in what could turn out to be a prolonged negotiation through lawyers and the media, its disappointing that News Corporation’s reputation with anyone other than shareholders seems to have passed the old dog by on this occasion.

I’m not suggesting Murdoch should be operating on behalf of anyone other than his own shareholders… but could you imagine Google looking after its own interests in such a blunt and one-dimensional way?

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Murdoch gives the order to charge

August 7, 2009

Rupert Murdoch has done it.  As suggested at News International’s last quarterly earnings call, he says his online newspaper portfolio will begin migrating towards a paid-for model within the next financial year.

The response has been electric, with no media title able to ignore the story.  As previously acknowledged here, at No Free Lunch, Murdoch is one of the few media moguls large enough to foment industry-wide change towards charging for online newspaper content, though in this instance, he is clearly being ably supported by the Financial Times’ Lionel Barber.

Commentary has varied in tone, from outright skepticism such as Larry Dignan’s analysis at ZDNet to praise from Andrew Keen at the Daily Telegraph.

But could this work?

Murdoch is in a unique position in the media – where he goes, he stands a very real chance that others will follow.  What this means is, while the skeptics are right that charging people for content will drive his audience to rival online sources, they are also missing a key dynamic: if the others start charging too, there will be nowhere to go.

The problem for online newspapers since they began giving away their content free has been the fragmented system online – news just leaks.  But if all – or even just a proportion – of the online newspaper community moves as one, this could work to everyone’s advantage.  As Andrew Keen says:

The holy grail of the digital economy is discovering how to get consumers to spend money on content. Nobody has figured this out yet.

So from now on, watch this space for other newspaper groups to announce ‘trials’, and in the longer term, a raft of lawsuits issued in response to plagiarism.