Archive for November, 2009

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Harding calls ‘the trickery and fakery’ of circulation figures

November 18, 2009

James Harding, Editor of The Times

Finally someone has said it.

The editor of The Times, James Harding, yesterday stated that circulation is not the be-all-and-end-all of online newspapers. And he went on to outline a number of ways he can add value for loyal (and presumably, paying) customers.

“We think it’s good for us and good for business to stop encouraging the trickery and fakery of the ABCs. We want real sales to real customers – that’s what our advertisers want too.”

The Murdoch show – followed closely here – rumbles on.

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Blogging could disappear as quickly as it has risen

November 18, 2009

 

Poll from PR Week: the PR industry should not trample all over social media

When something comes along and breathes life into a staid industry, but has not had time to establish deep roots, we should be careful to preserve it.

Blogging has challenged the media. Every week, bloggers rail against sloppy journalism. For perhaps the first time, there is a democratic and immediate response to any weak-minded argument that makes it onto the pages of a newspaper. It’s David and Goliath stuff, and its refreshing.

Nobody knows how the relationship between blogs and media will develop.  So far, it seems bloggers are becoming more skilled and better resourced, potentially challenging journalists. Meanwhile, most journalists I know are being asked to blog as well as write (or, from their perspective, being forced to write more for the same money!).

But the critical difference is that bloggers have not been confined by commercial interests from calling things the way they see them. This is liberating, and is something the mainstream media, with its vested interests, can never hope to compete with entirely.

Which is why its disappointing that it appears blogging is becoming tarnished by a lack of transparency.

In a nice post last weekend, Laurence Borel asked the question – should bloggers be paid to write blog posts? It’s a multi-layered question. Firstly – why not? Good bloggers should be paid, just like good online media should be paid-for.

But the big question is about transparency and the flow of money. The money should flow from the consumers of the blog, rather than from brand owners or companies. Otherwise it reduces blogging to advertising – undisclosed advertising.  This would be no more acceptable than if an ‘expert’ sold you a mortgage without telling you they were paid to sell you that particular one. Transparency is the big issue.

We should value the independence of bloggers. Sadly, the credibility of all bloggers will be damaged if there is a perception that they are taking money from the brand owners and companies they blog about. This is why it’s so important that we don’t allow this practice to take hold.

And why it’s so depressing to see that the majority of PR people in the UK have got this one wrong in a PR Week poll. The emergence of social media presents an enormous opportunity for the communications industry.  There has never been such demand for watertight strategy and precise implementation of complex and increasingly targeted communications campaigns.

The PR industry should be nurturing social media, not trampling all over it. Under pressure from the media on the one hand and encroaching regulatory scrutiny on the other, blogging is fragile enough.  Let the PR industry take a lead in setting out best practice.

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Murdoch: get off my land!

November 10, 2009
Rupert Murdoch

Picture courtesy of Michael Albov http://www.flickr.com/people/44653897@N00

So that’s how it’s going to be, then.  Rupert Murdoch today hinted that his decision to charge for online content will be enabled by building walls and closing access by legal action.  Not very new media.

The decision to charge for content on News Corporation’s media sites around the world (which include The Times and The Sun in the UK, Wall Street Journal via Dow Jones and The Australian) seemed like the first step in a sensible direction for online media.

Coming just a week after he admitted his online payment plans are behind schedule, Murdoch’s interview on Sky News Australia reveals he is prepared to take a very heavy-handed approach to ensuring he creates a watertight system for monetising his online media assets.

Is this worth it?  While there is rock-solid logic to the argument for charging for media content when there is a cost associated with its creation and distribution, it’s not clear that issuing threats to sue the BBC will genuinely help the media industry move towards a sensible settlement with its customers.

What’s holding back online media is a lack of micropayment standards to allow them to make money from their work.  The focus should be on the establishment of a standard that allows users to pay for what they use, without onerous barriers to entry (so a mix of prepay and post-billed options would make sense).

Even if this is merely the opening parry in what could turn out to be a prolonged negotiation through lawyers and the media, its disappointing that News Corporation’s reputation with anyone other than shareholders seems to have passed the old dog by on this occasion.

I’m not suggesting Murdoch should be operating on behalf of anyone other than his own shareholders… but could you imagine Google looking after its own interests in such a blunt and one-dimensional way?